Rudman Winchell is delighted to announce a new attorney.

By Rudman Winchell Attorney

Rudman Winchell is pleased to announce that Michael A. Hockenbury, Esq., has joined the firm and will practice within the Corporate and Business Practices group.  Prior to joining Rudman Winchell, Mike practiced with a litigation firm in Bangor where he focused his practice on various criminal, civil, probate, and corporate matters. Mike has also worked […]

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Your Appeals Questions, Answered Part III

By Rudman Winchell Attorney Jonathan Hunter

The trial court has entered judgment in your case.  Now what? This series of articles will examine some common questions on appeals to Maine’s Supreme Judicial Court, also known as the Law Court, in civil cases. How Long Will the Appeal Process Take? This is one of the most freqåuently asked questions about appeals, and […]

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Does all Property go Through Probate?

By Rudman Winchell Attorney

The purpose of a Last Will and Testament is to control the distribution of property in your probate estate after your death. But what property makes up your probate estate? Not all of it! Anything that is not part of your probate estate is not controlled by your Will and therefore will not be distributed […]

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New Maine Legislation: An Act Regarding Pay Equality

By Rudman Winchell Attorney Anne-Marie L. Storey

The business community is well aware that there are many proposed and pending pieces of legislation that would affect the workplace setting.  One of those, An Act Regarding Pay Equality, has already passed.  This law, which was signed into law by the Governor on April 12, amends both the general employment laws and the Maine […]

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Is Chalking Tires an Unconstitutional Search?

Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals Panel Declares the Common Parking Enforcement Practice of Chalking Tires an Unconstitutional Search… Seriously?! The transcript below is a slightly edited version of a chat amongst Rudman Winchell colleagues regarding this case and the implications it may have for Maine municipalities and parking ticket enthusiasts. SWW (Stephen W. Wagner): Last […]

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Rudman Winchell is pleased to announce Sarah K. Barr

By Rudman Winchell Attorney

Rudman Winchell is pleased to announce that Sarah K. Barr, Esq., has joined the firm. Sarah will practice with the Maine Elder Law Firm in the areas of estate planning, long-term care planning and asset protection, guardianship and conservatorship proceedings, estate, trust and probate administration, and special needs planning. Sarah is excited to be a […]

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Which Type of Business Entity is Best for me? Part One

By Rudman Winchell Attorney Katelynn Ronan

In this two-part series, we’ll discuss the differences in the following business entities: Sole Proprietorship, Partnership, and Limited Liability Company. Congratulations! You want to start a business. You’ve perfected a million dollar idea and are excited to hit the ground running. You’ve fine tuned your process, know who your target market is, and maybe even […]

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Your Appeals Questions, Answered Part II

By Rudman Winchell Attorney Jonathan Hunter

The trial court has entered judgment in your case. Now what? This series of articles will examine some common questions on appeals to Maine’s Supreme Judicial Court (or Law Court) in civil cases. How Much Time do I Have to File an Appeal? An appeal must be filed within 21 days after the entry of […]

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Is That Pot Shop Legal: Maine Municipalities Wrestle with Whether to “Opt in” to Marijuana

By Rudman Winchell Attorney Stephen Wagner

As a municipal attorney in Maine, I can never predict what new legal challenge one of our many municipal clients will call about next. This is one of my favorite parts about my job. I say hardly because there is one topic that has come up very frequently over the past several months—marijuana. Given the […]

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Can Municipalities Make a Profit From Tax Lien Sales?

Can a Municipality Make a Profit by Selling my Property After a Tax Lien Foreclosure? Prior to 2015, the answer was always yes. Regardless of the amount received at the sale, any proceeds on properties sold in a tax lien foreclosure belonged to the municipality. If your outstanding taxes and fees were $5,000 and the […]

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